Tracing Your Ancestry

Discussion in 'TalkCeltic Pub' started by Business Hawk, Mar 17, 2017.

Discuss Tracing Your Ancestry in the TalkCeltic Pub area at TalkCeltic.net.

  1. faw cough

    faw cough Gold Member Gold Member

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    Oliver and Anders?
     
  2. Finn Balor

    Finn Balor Beer enthusiast Gold Member

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    Scottish/Irish on my da's side, Ayrshire and Ulster to be precise. Purely Irish on my mothers side, Leinster.

    Nothing exciting, was hoping to find something exotic when i was researching but nae joy.
     
  3. hakumeikirameki

    hakumeikirameki

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    I don't want to start untangling that web. Only just found out last year that my mum's brother isn't, for instance. :88:
     
  4. JimMc

    JimMc

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    Not quite rubbish but not far wrong. DNA ancestry is a money maker that presently at best gives a basic indicator of a likely general ancestry based on a limited and by default flawed database.

    However a mirror can't tell you are naïve, where as paying around a 100 for a DNA test gives a hint.
     
  5. JimMc

    JimMc

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    Written out of history! The Irish had a big influence in Wales, especially North
    I see other explanations for name places such as Gower Peninsula, but I suspect it was corrupted from the old Irish language and many ancient Irish settlers there.
    AghaGower in Mayo -- Goat Field
    Gower peninsula has so many references to Goat

    Anyways lots of ancient Gaelic links - Fittingly on a day Ireland stop the Sassenach from a party, I recall a Welsh Rugby commentator a few years ago saying a Welshman is a Irishman who can swim.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brychan
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2017
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  6. Jeannie960

    Jeannie960 Gold Member Gold Member

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    My post back then

    Genealogy is my favorite pastime :50: Just a few off the top of my head.

    www.ancestry.com I dip in and out of as it you can pay one off subscriptions. It's an expensive site.

    www.genealogy.com free

    www.familysearch.org free

    www.freecen.org.uk free

    www.genesreunited.co.uk free but if you want to swap and share tree info you have to pay around £20 for the year. Worth getting your tree on it though as it can open it all up for you.

    www.census.nationalarchives.ie (free Irish Census info)

    www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk Register free and get a feel for the records you can access. Costs around £7 for 30 credits to search and view (1 per page of results and 5 to view a document)


    The Glasgow Room in the Mitchell Library Glasgow which holds records for not only Glasgow City but surrounding counties i.e Renfrewshire etc. It's a brilliant free resource as they have censuses and everything right there as well as old newspapers etc.

    There are a number of family history societies up and down the country the bigger ones being in Ayrshire and Wigtownshire. Most main local libraries will contain a mine of family history information. Loads of links online.

    The Watt Library in Greenock holds everything you can imagine for Renfrewshire (censuses and post office records etc).

    Free access to death records for Greenock www.inverclyde.gov.uk/community-lif...story-and-heritage/family-history/intimations

    You can book an afternoon in the Registrars Office in Glasgow or Edinburgh where you will be shown how to access the records and be allowed to get on with your search. It involves a small fee which I can't remember how much but it's amazing how much you get access to if you use your brain.......essentially everything but don't be nosy :56: I would say go organised and with a plan in mind as it's easy to get distracted and go off looking at something you hadn't intended too! You will have to pay for copies if you intend taking them away.

    I'm going to add to this. You can search and view the Sasine Registers which give details of family Wills/Testaments etc. I generally visit www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk to search the Wills/Testaments to see if there's anything in my family name. These documents were generally lodged in whatever court the person was closest to at the time i.e. Greenock or Glasgow Sheriff Court. I then either download what I find or, if I'm not sure the document pertains to my family, I visit the Registrars Office and view them there. These documents are fantastic for giving you detail of who was still around at the time to claim the estate or who it was left too, when/where the person died etc. This very often ties up with your findings. I had an ancestor who, the last surviving member of the family, died in Edinburgh. She was a nurse and she left her money to the nurses benevolent fund and her body to science!

    Well that list isn't exhaustive so good luck! I would add to all that ......try to find out where family members are buried and get a listing of the grave from the local council. I went searching for my gran and found she was in one of three plots which contained the remains of 21 individuals incl infants, interments and ash! The dead truly do speak to us at times!

    A lot of my research was on Greenock through my dads paternal side and I've a acquired a lot of info. Anyone looking for Pre 1855 MI's for grave/church/cemeteries in Renfrewshire I have a book containing them all. Inclusive of Cathcart, Eaglesham, Gourock etc.

    Don't be put off as it's a really fulfilling hobby and once you've caught the bug it's always with you.



    Irish records are notoriously hard to get as many of the records were destroyed by the British. Excerpts of 1841 Antrim Censuses survived and quite good. Next one is 1811 I'm afraid and you can view that free on the National Archives for Ireland site http://www.nationalarchives.ie/
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2017
  7. Aidan O'Shea

    Aidan O'Shea Gold Member Gold Member

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    Why do you aim to hurt me so?
     
  8. celts67

    celts67

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    Happy days just traced mine on one of them links Jeannie960 posted looks like the grandas granda was born in Clough county Antrim his old man born in Ireland as well .
     
  9. Jeannie960

    Jeannie960 Gold Member Gold Member

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    Well done! Your journey has only started :50: I have the census records for Antrim 1841 which I will post on here later, if you want, when I dig them out of my files. Try to find out where your folks are buried as there will be records or the stones might tell you more.

    I have a very dubious connection to Antrim :52: My granny was an Agnew and her Uncle was involved in Gun Running for the Unionists prior to the 1st World War kicking off :52: A truly fascinating tale of intrigue and skull duggery :56:Apologies for this :52:

    http://www.larnetimes.co.uk/news/larne-lodge-lays-wreaths-at-clyde-valley-graves-1-6022138

    http://www.libraryireland.com/ulsters-stand-for-union/voyage-adventure.php

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larne_gun-running
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2017
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  10. celts67

    celts67

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    That's me just about identified mine was on that website to somebody who thinks the same county Antrim it looks like .Grandas great uncle born in Ballymena as well .
     
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  11. celts67

    celts67

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    That's mine traced just got a cracking link with the the old mans side whole family on it all defintly from Antrim and immigrated to Scotland .1876 or 1877 they moved here happy days .
     
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  12. Jeannie960

    Jeannie960 Gold Member Gold Member

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    Should be easy for you to get all the stuff in the Scottish 1881, 1891,1901,1911 Censuses. Well done :50: Chasing the dead can be an expensive business :56:
     
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  13. celts67

    celts67

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    I think that's me back to Scotland says i've got routes to clan Ronald wilkipedia says also known as clan McDonald read my family fled to antrim after the battle of culloden still catholics though thank f--k supported the catholic side and married an Irish catholic .
     
  14. Jeannie960

    Jeannie960 Gold Member Gold Member

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    Well at that time Protestants were in the minority there and their religion wasn't recognised. My great++ grandfather was a Presbyterian preacher in Ballynarry and from what I gather they were a dull lot. No housework or doing anything enjoyable on a Sunday..the day was dedicated to the good book! A very staid and strict people. Seems he travelled all over preaching.
     
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  15. Lancashire Nick

    Lancashire Nick

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    One of my Uncles (my Dad's younger brother) traced the male side of the family back to the Norman Conquest, 1066 and all that. One of my ancestors, Richard was put in charge of an area in what is now central Lancashire.

    On my Mum's side, I don't think it has been done; but would be difficult anyway as one of her grandparents was American, and another was Swiss.
     
  16. Briggs_bhoy

    Briggs_bhoy

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    Been meaning to do this, found my great grans birth certificate in my grans house a while ago, so quite a good place to start.

    Was in the Mitchell library a while ago and they have a huge section for parish records and stuff along that line.
     
  17. Jeannie960

    Jeannie960 Gold Member Gold Member

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    Actually the Americans are into this sort of thing in a big way. Ancestry.com is an amazing resource for family tree stuff over there. Saying that people from all over the world use that site. If your mum was born here in Scotland you just check her birth or marriage certificate to get her parents etc and then you might find something pertaining to them....maybe a marriage. Anyway if you haven't already done it put your tree on Ancestry. You only need to subscribe if you wish to view others trees. I let people find me, give them access to my tree and ask them to add in anything useful if they have it. I find that works quite well and I've been contacted by people from all over.

    In one section of my tree on mums side I got back to 1672, 1740 with another and in my dads side I got back to 1725. His family came from around the borders and settled in Greenock/Inverkip/Gourock around this time. It's been an interesting journey.
     
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  18. Jeannie960

    Jeannie960 Gold Member Gold Member

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    yep the Glasgow Room in the Mitchell Library is excellent but a lot of the links above will help. Freecen in particular for early censuses in Scotland.
     
  19. smokie899

    smokie899 Gold Member Gold Member

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    Parents both from republican families of west Belfast, so ain't going to find feck all as their way of life was to be always under the radar.
    Mind if you've ever traveled to a game on an eamon Rooney coach, they're related lol
    Oh and my granda was from the country so I grew up hearing stories about uncles of uncles uncle and cousins of cousins cousin... strange people them country folk
     
  20. celts67

    celts67

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    F--k I think I can't be 100 percent but it adds up . The clan my family go back to wilkipedia says they probably fought with Robert the Bruce at the battle of Bannockburn .