Coping with Depression, Stress, Anxiety and other Mental Health Illnesses

Discussion in 'TalkCeltic Pub' started by Drakhan, Apr 8, 2016.

Discuss Coping with Depression, Stress, Anxiety and other Mental Health Illnesses in the TalkCeltic Pub area at TalkCeltic.net.

  1. seamus1967 Gold Member Gold Member

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    Nice post.

    When I hit rock bottom the first time one of the things they gave was a low dose of quitiopine. It's used as an antipsychotic but they used to give it to suicidal patients in very low doseages to get them to sleep. It's extremely difficult to overdose on it and it used to knock me out a treat. Unfortunately the recipe changed and it is no longer effective.

    I've found diazipam is great as an aid for sleep but doesn't actually knock me out. Also you build up a tolerance to it quite quickly and it is highly addictive. The withdrawal is worse than smack I'm told.

    As for the many others, you just have to look at the list of possible side effects.

    I've had extreme anxiety for some time now. It comes and goes but it's totally debilitating when it's bad. To the point where I often think on death. I can go for 3days & nights without sleep easily, then sleep about 4 hours and do the same again. I'm 6'7" and only weigh just over 10 stone.

    But what worries me about the various meds is that I never had depression until I started on them.

    It's not like feeling down; my body feels like it weighs a ton. Everything looses any purpose or pleasure. Even any feelings of love for anyone just die. Comfortably numb. It's weird as * and comes on in an instant.

    I swear I NEVER had this until I started on anti depressants.

    So anyone reading this think long and hard before taking the meds. Try everything else first. It's like rolling a dice.

    Having said that, the meds are better than death and NOT everyone has adverse side effects.

    Peace & love.
     
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  2. clonbhoy

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    Fair play for your honesty.
    I was close to being addicted to Diazepam. It is incredibly easy. You feel like nothing in the world matters after one, that's an addictive feeling. The withdrawals are horrid though. I think I have tried to overdose on most of the medication of been on, nearly all of them as a result of being on it!

    Can I ask how your lifestyle and daily routine is through it all? I'll be honest about myself here to explain my nosiness! I used to manage pubs and had to quit last November. I was self medicating on booze(see Diazepam!) and was close to becoming dependent. I knew I had to quit the booze and to do so meant I had to quit the job. I hit rock bottom nearly straight away though, went on one last blowout on the booze, nearly lost my partner and didn't know where to go. I live in England but I am from Cork, and considered giving up and going home. I considered worse too. The only good things were that I had enough money to go a while without working and on the Tuesday, when I had stopped boozing, I got a phone call from Mind. I had been on a waiting list and got to the top. Perfect timing.
    But initially my routine was brutal. My partner stayed with a friend to give us some space and make me realise what to do. My paranoia and anxiety was at fever pitch. I didn't leave the gaff and only went to the door to collect the takeaways I lived on. I wouldn't even make myself a cup of tea. I spent most of that time watching * on television and freaking out. When I went to see them at Mind I was a mess, looked a mess. They basically said, no matter how hard it is, you have to fashion a routine,mainly for your sleep. Go to bed around 12 and get up at 8, whether you slept or not. Have a shower first thing, go to the shops and get some breakfast. Once you do it once you start getting little bits of self-respect back. Within a fortnight I was back doing long walks, had my interest in reading and the cinema back and the following week my missus moved back in.
    I know my insomnia has never, even at its worst, been as bad as yours sounds, but some semblance of routine does help. Find a peaceful spot too. I don't mean going halfway up a mountain, or having to get on a train if you live in a big city, it can be your kitchen, but somewhere that makes you feel relaxed, safe and all those things making you anxious seem elsewhere. I go down the river where I live, stick some music on and concentrate on the serenity of nature. I normally stop and watch a heron for 10-15 minutes, he has a set spot, and it makes me forget about everything. Go see someone you care about, even for five minutes, or call them on the phone. You don't have to tell them anything is wrong if you don't want to. Just remind yourself why we go through this * for.

    Comfortably numb is an expression I have used to describe my feelings. I have watched Celtic play big matches and the result didn't seem to matter. Tories would come on the television and I wouldn't even swear! Joking aside, it is a horrible feeling and, having felt both, it is worse than being suicidal. When you are suicidal, you are caring about what happens to you and often on how you think it will positively impact other people. When you don't care whether you live or die, when you feel you are losing contact with reality is when you fear both death and life; limbo is an awful place to live. You have to try and care what happens to ya, because it is harder for anybody else to care when you don't.
    My advice is only based on my own battles, this battle I am currently winning isn't my first and the war will probably go on forever, but keep fighting and don't let the * grind you down.
     
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  3. seamus1967 Gold Member Gold Member

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    Lifestyle and daily routine don't exist at the moment. The shrink and my support worker keep saying about getting a routine but it's difficult. If I try to lie in bed for 8hrs to get a sleep pattern set up then I put myself at risk of an anxiety head *. I find its best for me to try to do something constructive (which is itself difficult as it really does affect my memory).

    Also at the moment I'm staying a lot in Scotland with my da who's slowly coming to an end. Hes got no routine either so we're a right pair :87:

    But I've definitely taken inspiration from your comments on it. It seems to have had a fair impact on you. I know from a course I did in child development ages ago that children really thrive on routine. It makes them feel safe, secure and confident. When you think about it we'r all just big kids! My current situation makes it hard but when that changes I'll be onto it.

    I've been really lucky with the money side. Somehow I managed to get on that PIP thing so I don't have the worry of counting every penny. There are plenty like us who aren't that fortunate. My heart goes out to them.

    "concentrate on the serenity of nature."
    This.

    Like you my local river is a godsend. I live in rural Wales so we have nice hills and open spaces away from anything that would kick it off but yes, that's a big one. If I can get the time I'll be roughing it in the woods in the summer for a couple of weeks. I'm pretty sure it'll have a big impact.

    One thing I've done recently is to stop watching the news. That defiantly feeds the anxiety big time. All the * that's going on with them tory * just * my head right up. I feel bad as it's like I'm ignoring what is happening to other people but I really have to get through this. It's definitely helping though.

    And I sympathise with you about the drink. A couple of years back I was using it on the days when I'd lay off the diazepam. I also use it when I have to get on a train, go to the shop etc. But the past few months it's not been working so good. Daft idea to be using it anyway. The day after a 3 litre binge the come down just feeds the anxiety and it all starts again.

    Please don't feel like you're being nosey. Talking about in here means other people can take something from it. It doesn't help when you feel you're the only person going through it. And people who don't have it may read this and maybe understand it a bit more.

    It's not a disability that is obvious and that can make people become quit judgmental .
     
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  4. packybhoy Administrator Administrator

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    Yes mate 110%. That’s what they done to you and it’s good for people to know the dangers or downfalls but as that side of the coin keeps being pushed then I am telling it from the perspective that in the worst case then see your GP and go with the suggestion if it will help. Yes, you have to question everything as that goes without saying. The right GP will start you on small doses and move you up if needed and they will try a combination. I have tried 3/4 times to come off my meds and have been in a fairly bad place. The sleep pattern goes off as you say, 3/4 days awake and you go stir crazy. I’m lucky I have been appointed a psychiatric team to monitor me twice a month but more of needed.
    I have found by sticking to my prescribed dose it makes me much better and more tolerable for my family. It also regulates my sleep and help me stick to the routine of a full time job. Most importantly it removes any thoughts of ending it all and that would be more tragic for my family and friends than for me. I’m pragmatic enough about death and overall don’t particularly have a fear of it. That is a lot different and more positive than wishing for it or doing something about it. So it’s fair to say from my side the meds have greatly helped me as I’m bang in the middle of this process. I look forward to a time I can bin them and treat myself naturally. Just a few details on how they have worked for me. But as you say Seamus, it ain’t for everyone.
     
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  5. seamus1967 Gold Member Gold Member

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    I did point out in an earlier post that it's better to have the meds than death :50:

    Glad they're working for you. Regularity is the key they say.
    :celt_2:

    I've become pragmatic myself about the death thing too now. Having stared it in the face I know now it won't be wasting my life popping pills & slugging whiskey.

    But if it does come to that time I can always go visit Westminster & get them to do it :)
     
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  6. packybhoy Administrator Administrator

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    Nothing wrong with slugging whiskey. It’s been an old friend many times in recent years. It’s the bad women will kill ye.:86:
     
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  7. clonbhoy

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    I can understand where you are coming from regarding to want to do something constructive but, and I am only going on my own experience here, when we think of routine we over complicate it. We think of set-times to eat, go to bed and all the other necessities of life, but it need not be so regimented. I never could be like that, it just wouldn't suit my personality, and you certainly don't need to plan every moment of your day, but by slowly making small goals and achievements you actually feel as if you have done something constructive.Try and stay in the bed a few nights, read or listen to music or the radio if you need a distraction from the thoughts, and when you do get up do something beneficial for yourself in the morning. That doesn't have to be life changing; just going to the shops and getting food in or getting the paper. Building on these things is how you get a routine.
    I know how difficult it can sound, which is why I don't want to condescend or make it sound so easy, I know it isn't. We do make things harder for ourselves though! The one thing that unites all people who suffer from mental health problems is we make things seem much more difficult than they are.
    I mean, what I call a routine isn't a planned day! Apart from when I have appointments there is nothing set in stone, but by doing simple things like shopping and cooking you gradually regain your sense of self that anxiety takes from you.


    Yeah, the boozing with me was cyclical. I would be feeling a little off so would medicate on the booze. I would get a massive high having craic in the pub, followed by a low the next day. The second day the anxiety would kick in and would be lingering the third day. By the evening I would be alright, but felt a beer would help and be back to square one. Also, because I wasn't fully dependent, not to mention because I have a culturally distorted view of alcohol, I didn't realise how damaging this was for me. It certainly wasn't easy to break it and I associated the good parts of drinking with most aspects of my personality. The beers at the football, having a beer listening to my music or going to gigs, a lot of the books I seemed to read, or the authors I liked, the films I watched, everything always seemed to revolve around booze culture. On top of that, I worked in pubs. I was immersed in something that was a part of the problem. The thing I used to help ease the anxiety was one of its biggest causes. Which is why I had a fortnight of takeaways and television for idiots when I had to stop! But by gradually building that routine, as trivial as it seems, I have taken back control of the things I enjoy doing and got a life back. I can look forward to the game tomorrow and not need a beer before it( I might after it though!).
     
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